1/144 HGUC Hy-Gogg Review

“Nod aircraft have evolved considerably since TW2. Nod is fielding the VTOL Venom Scout, the batwing Vertigo Stealth Bomber, a Carryall that can transport troops and equipment, and a high altitude, long range bomber called the Armageddon.

Venoms are lightly armed and armored but can take on a wide variety of targets on the ground and in the air – they are even capable of engaging our Orcas in air-to-air combat.

The Vertigo evades detection by most GDI sensors and only “de-cloaks” to drop it powerful bombs on target structures and vehicles.

The Nod Carryall is the counterpart to our V-35 Ox, a VTOL aircraft that can pick up and transport a wide variety of troops and equipment.

Finally, the Armageddon is seen infrequently but when it appears on the battlefield, it is usually bringing bad news. Nod Armageddon aircraft are used to deliver cluster mines and a number of exotic air-to-ground weapons.”

-Intelligence Database, InOps Field Guide to Nod Aircraft in TW3 Theaters of War

Adapted from Tiberium Wars

From the terror of A-LAWS to the terror of the Neo Zeon seas. Today I’ll be reviewing the 1/144 scale HGUC Hy-Gogg from the Mobile Suit Gundam 0080: War in the Pocket mini series.

As mentioned in my Z-Gok E review, Steiner Hardy led a team armed with Hy-Goggs into the Earth Federation’s Artic base with the sole purpose of capturing or destroying the Gundam Alex prototype. While the operation was a failure, the Cyclops team however managed to do quite a number to the base before retreat, and is by far on of the most epic fight scenes you will ever see in War in the Pocket.

The Hy-Gogg moves away from the traditional Gogg design and incorporates quite a lot of new features of its own. It uses a very good shell structire for the shoulders and main body.

Now then, lets get down to that detail.

In terms of articulation, the Hy-Gogg has a unique way of doing things. Like the Z-Gok, it has no movable head as its head is part of the main body. It can rotate at the waist 360 degrees and lacks the up and down motion of the Z-Gok.

The Hy-Gogg’s arms a unique case. The arms consist of three joint segments each with a good amount of bend as well as the wrist capable of rotating 360 and bending at that point as well. Each finger is articulate to the hand and the shoulder is capable of rotating 360 and moving in and out of from the body quite well.

The legs are the least articulate of the entire model even though the legs have some joints as well. The knees are single jointed and dont really bend much. Each of the four toes on the foot can bend 90 degrees downward to support its cruise mode and the foot itself can rotate somewhat though limited.

So from what you can see, this unit has good articulation from the waist up. Simple, but decent enough for a mobile suit of its kind. Thanks to its large toes, it has no problem standing on it own feet. And even then, it can rely on it arms for support when needed as well.

For accessories, the Hy-Gogg comes with a few. You get two pairs of missile containers, a pair of missiles and a booster jetpack identical to the one which was given to the Z-Gok type E model kit.

The missiles peg into a hole on the ‘palm’ of the Hy-Gogg. That same hole as we all know also serves as the beam cannon of the unit. In order to attach the missile containers onto the hands, you must first remove a panel above the fingers and remove the cannon and finger components completely. This gives the hands enough room to sandwich the containers (which both comes in two pieces) onto it. Unfortunately, this means that you cant have the missiles on the model while the containers are on which is quite a bummer. But logically speaking it wouldn’t fit considering its scale.

Lastly the jet pack booster attaches from a peg onto a hole between the thrusters on the back of the Hy-Gogg. Simple enough just like its brother.

As mentioned before the Hy-Gogg supports  a special cruise mode when moving through water. To transform it you need to first remove the segmented parts of the arm from the shoulder and the hand from the arm itself and reattach the hand where the arm used to go. Equipping the missile containers is optional, but it would certainly improve its appearance. Having the jet pack on is optional as well.

Once that’s done fold down the shoulder armor so that it covers the arm/containers, straighten out the legs and fold down the toes. The results is as shown below.

On a similar note you can leave the short arms on when in MS mode, though it does look awfully retarded. I rather it be called ‘floppy’ than ‘stumpy’.

Lets get down to the problems. Surprisingly enough, the Hy-Gogg also shares a similar problem with the Z-Gok type E in the case of its arms. Not in terms of assembly, it was pretty easy to get it together, but in terms of movement. The arm joints of the Hy-Gogg have pipe-like designs on each segment. However the gap that allows the arm to bend through just barely clears the piping in the joints.

The result of this is that its lovely pipes often get caught when bending the arm and I fear I might break something if I apply too  much force.

Surprisingly again, the stickers weren’t much of a problem. Though small (most of it is the metallic red ones which go on gaps over the body/arm), with a good tweezers, you can get them in nice and snugly.

Now then, into the Stronghold grinder it goes and heres the result.

Pros:

Articulation

Playvalue

Cons:

-molding of arm joints

Overall the Hy-Gogg is a decently good model kit to have as it has slightly more play value and articulation than the Z-Gok type E. A must have if your absolutely addicted to aquatic Zeon mobile suits. Its a pity it cant store the missile in the container, but, oh well.

Final Rating: 3.5/5 stars

-Raisha

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~ by Raisha on January 12, 2011.

2 Responses to “1/144 HGUC Hy-Gogg Review”

  1. I bet the orange hand casings make for a good club.

    I guess the hand joints did it in, LOL.

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